Category Archives: Poland

Which Polander said this

Continue reading Which Polander said this

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Polish Air Force One

A footnote for those who do not read Polish

On 10 April 2010, the Polish Air Force One, a Tupolev Tu-154M, fin number 101, crashes near Smolensk, Russia. All 96 on board die, including the President of the Republic of Poland and the First Lady, Polish military chiefs of staff, members of Parliament and senators, the chairman of the central bank […]

za pomocą Dr inż. Lasek w obliczu całkowitej ruiny – Salon24 | Niezależne Forum Publicystów.

There’s a Poland Caucus?

With the assistance of a translator they said, they are hoping for Oscar :oops:  :arrow: that’s why the secret police informer bio has a hope in the title :roll:

Who else was there? The film’s star Robert Wieckiewicz (who pulls off Walesa’s moustache pretty well); Polish ambassador Ryszard Schnepf; and Sen. Barbara Mikulski, a member of the U.S. Senate Poland Caucus. (There’s a Poland Caucus? Who knew?)

za pomocą Lech Walesa cracks jokes — in Polish.

A Bluetooth for your new iPhone 5

It seems that support guys at Apple have no idea, why customers cry about old bluetooth NOT WORKING any more with new iPhone 5. Customers have problems with blueteeth with HFP 1.5 and older versions. HFP 1.6 will work with iPhone 5.

Summary

iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch support multiple Bluetooth profiles when running the latest version of iOS. This document details the differences in Bluetooth-profile support from one device to the next.

The following table details supported Bluetooth profiles by device when using the latest version of iOS.

Continue reading A Bluetooth for your new iPhone 5

Klub trzeciego miejsca

POLANDiAN

Notice how I couldn’t avoid two Americanisms in my title complaining about Americanisms! 😉

This is the root of the problem, some Americanisms are darn fine ones but others just drive me completely bonkers crazy. Take the word “guess” for example. The way I use it it is a fine complement to the English version of “suppose”. I can say “I suppose you will be holidaying in Tuscany again this year?” meaning I don’t know for sure but there has been at least an element of deduction or calculation involved (say because the person has been to Tuscany the last five years in a row). I can also say “I guess not.” when I’m asked whether Obama will win the next election, giving the impression that whilst I still have an opinion, I really am guessing. Damn is a good, more widely known, alternative to sod in a similar way…

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